Carpe Diem #377, Tayshet

blood and sweat gurgle
noise of train laced with whispers
rails keep history

“According to some survivor accounts, between Tayshet and Bratsk there is “a dead man under every sleeper.” Along with Japanese prisoners from the Kwantung Army, German prisoners of war formed a large proportion of the forced labor contingent, generally under a 25-year sentence. The Germans were repatriated in autumn of 1955, after West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s visit to Moscow.”

In response to Carpe Diem #377, Tayshet

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6 thoughts on “Carpe Diem #377, Tayshet

  1. If the rails of the Trans Siberian Railroad could talk … what would they tell us … they are the keepers of that history. What an awesome haiku Sky … very strong in it’s image.

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